Never in history has violence been initiated by the oppressed. How could they be the initiators, if they themselves are the result of violence? How could they be the sponsors of something whose objective inauguration called forth their existence as oppressed? There would be no oppressed had there been no prior situation of violence to establish their subjugation. Violence is initiated by those who oppress, who exploit, who fail to recognise others as persons - not by those who are oppressed, exploited and unrecognised.

Paulo FreirePedagogy of the Oppressed  (1968)

(via infijir-deactivated20140529)

Hind Al-Husseni (center) with children at the Dar Al Tifel school in Jerusalem, Palestine 1948
(my grandmother is to her right in the coat with the buttons down the front)
It started with a social worker…
Some influences in our lives run deep. Long before I was born, I was wired for a love of a home and a purpose.  A deep, profound, beautiful and liberating purpose. I owe a lot of that to an extraordinary woman.
Hind Al-Husseini opened the Dar Al-Tifel home in Jerusalem 66 years ago today on her birthday, two weeks following the Deir Yassin massacre. She gave my grandmother and other children who had lost their homes and families a home full of warmth and love. Over the years, she gave thousands of Palestinian children a home, an education and a replenishing hope that rekindled purpose. 

She taught my grandmother the true meaning of selflessness, strength, determination and resolve.  I will always have the sincerest respect and admiration for her humility and modesty. Sit Hind Al-Husseini was a truly beautiful person in every way. Her legacy is a reminder of the unshakable resolve of the people who challenge me to value every blessing, every comfort in every breath, and every precious day of health and happiness. 
Hind Al-Husseini, may she rest in power 
(April 25, 1916  – September 13, 1994)  High-res

Hind Al-Husseni (center) with children at the Dar Al Tifel school in Jerusalem, Palestine 1948

(my grandmother is to her right in the coat with the buttons down the front)

It started with a social worker…

Some influences in our lives run deep. Long before I was born, I was wired for a love of a home and a purpose.  A deep, profound, beautiful and liberating purpose. I owe a lot of that to an extraordinary woman.

Hind Al-Husseini opened the Dar Al-Tifel home in Jerusalem 66 years ago today on her birthday, two weeks following the Deir Yassin massacre. She gave my grandmother and other children who had lost their homes and families a home full of warmth and love. Over the years, she gave thousands of Palestinian children a home, an education and a replenishing hope that rekindled purpose.

She taught my grandmother the true meaning of selflessness, strength, determination and resolve.  I will always have the sincerest respect and admiration for her humility and modesty. Sit Hind Al-Husseini was a truly beautiful person in every way. Her legacy is a reminder of the unshakable resolve of the people who challenge me to value every blessing, every comfort in every breath, and every precious day of health and happiness. 

Hind Al-Husseini, may she rest in power 

(April 25, 1916 – September 13, 1994) 

My mother used to say to me, ‘You can’t eat beauty, it doesn’t feed you.’ And these words played and bothered me, I didn’t really understand them until finally I realized that beauty was not a thing that I could acquire or consume. It was something that I just had to be. And what my mother meant by saying that you can’t eat beauty is that you can’t rely on beauty to sustain you. What actually sustains us, what is fundamentally beautiful is compassion for yourself and those around you. That kind of beauty inflames the heart and enchants the soul.

Lupita Nyong’o  (via tiredestprincess)

(via semtitulox3)

awaitingmyescape:

My dad just came back from the cancer clinic and when my mom asked how it went he said “we’ll talk about it later”. He’s already at stage 4, I don’t think he can handle any more bad news.  He was extremely tense :(

Please keep him in your duaas 

Allah yeshfee ya Rabb. May Allah swt Ashafee give him full shifa’ and give him comfort, and reward him ya Rabb. Ameen. 

(via duaa4duaa)

descentintotyranny:

Why was this Nazi able to kill?
The same government locks up Muslims and Arabs as part of a “war on terror” allowed a real terrorist to roam the streets for the better part of four decades, writes Joe Allen.
Apr. 17 2014
FRAZIER GLENN Miller, also known as “Frazier Glenn Cross,” a prominent neo-Nazi organizer for at least four decades, murdered three people in Overland Park, Kansas, on April 13.
Miller’s victims included 14-year-old Reat Griffin Underwood and his grandfather, Dr. William Lewis Corporon, who were shot and killed while sitting in a car at the Jewish Community Center of Greater Kansas City. Terry LaManno was shot at Village Shalom, a nearby assisted living center, where she was visiting her mother.
After his arrest near Village Shalom, Miller continued spewing racist and anti-Semitic filth while handcuffed in the back seat of a police car. KMBC, a local television station, recorded Miller screaming “Heil Hitler!”
In the 24 hours following Miller’s murder spree, his vile opinions and political history became widely known—thanks primarily to the efforts of the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), which tracks hate groups.
But the big question that comes to mind after reading this mountain of material on Miller’s extensive involvement with violent Nazi groups is: Why was this man still roaming the streets?
Read More

descentintotyranny:

Why was this Nazi able to kill?

The same government locks up Muslims and Arabs as part of a “war on terror” allowed a real terrorist to roam the streets for the better part of four decades, writes Joe Allen.

Apr. 17 2014

FRAZIER GLENN Miller, also known as “Frazier Glenn Cross,” a prominent neo-Nazi organizer for at least four decades, murdered three people in Overland Park, Kansas, on April 13.

Miller’s victims included 14-year-old Reat Griffin Underwood and his grandfather, Dr. William Lewis Corporon, who were shot and killed while sitting in a car at the Jewish Community Center of Greater Kansas City. Terry LaManno was shot at Village Shalom, a nearby assisted living center, where she was visiting her mother.

After his arrest near Village Shalom, Miller continued spewing racist and anti-Semitic filth while handcuffed in the back seat of a police car. KMBC, a local television station, recorded Miller screaming “Heil Hitler!”

In the 24 hours following Miller’s murder spree, his vile opinions and political history became widely known—thanks primarily to the efforts of the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), which tracks hate groups.

But the big question that comes to mind after reading this mountain of material on Miller’s extensive involvement with violent Nazi groups is: Why was this man still roaming the streets?

Read More

(via disciplesofmalcolm)

It’s funny, the stereotypes we given. Lazy, as if we ain’t build an entire country on our backs. Thieves, as if we wasn’t stolen from our home. Hateful, as if we was the ones that murder for dark skin. Selfish, as if we took over another people’s country and claimed they land as our own. Funny, how them stereotypes so perfectly describe the ones who done doomed us all.

My grandmother, talking to my brother who was recently called, “nothing but a black thug” for daring to wear a hoodie in the rain. (via asiaraymonet)

(via myvoicemyright)

ajanebedout:

Genuine question:

How many articles published on anti occupation blogs does it take to assuage your white guilt*?

image

* Also applies to Americans/ Westerners etc

"Ismi Falasteen" (My Name is Palestine)
The olive tree: at once a symbol of peace throughout the Mediterranean and an embodiment of identity deeply entrenched in Palestinian culture. The olive tree is also the foundation for the economic activity and development in Palestine. Planting an olive tree, therefore, is both expressing a desire for peace and also a desire to protect lands from dispossession and ruin.

The scattered pockets of color which compose this mural are but a symbol of a culture, an identity, which is itself disjointed and in fragments. In contrast, the phrase ‘My name is Palestine’ affirms the existence of this identity. Naming is one manner through which to assert the presence of a people, a history, and a culture. High-res

"Ismi Falasteen" (My Name is Palestine)

The olive tree: at once a symbol of peace throughout the Mediterranean and an embodiment of identity deeply entrenched in Palestinian culture. The olive tree is also the foundation for the economic activity and development in Palestine. Planting an olive tree, therefore, is both expressing a desire for peace and also a desire to protect lands from dispossession and ruin.

The scattered pockets of color which compose this mural are but a symbol of a culture, an identity, which is itself disjointed and in fragments. In contrast, the phrase ‘My name is Palestine’ affirms the existence of this identity. Naming is one manner through which to assert the presence of a people, a history, and a culture.

“The desire to go home that is a desire to be whole, to know where you are, to be the point of intersection of all the lines drawn through all the stars, to be the constellation-maker and the center of the world, that center called love. To awaken from sleep, to rest from awakening, to tame the animal, to let the soul go wild, to shelter in darkness and blaze with light, to cease to speak and be perfectly understood.” 
― Rebecca Solnit